Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Hire a Hacker


Employers look at real-life hackers as taboo. Not script-kiddies that run scripts from a terminal window, hackers are self-motivated in the real-life world by intrigue and trying to figure out how to create a window of opportunity or solution.

We are targeted as people that smoke weed and hack for fun, that is almost true, but we are self-motivated with IQ’s over 150 to 200 so on. I do not speak for all, but I relate to most. We did not pick our career to be IT Specialist. We pick it for the sure joy and pleasure of learning and advancing technology, no other motivation is needed.

To live a lot of us have taken bad roles in the electronic world because well we need to eat too. I want to wear my hoodie at the office. I want to relax and be able to code and fix holes in the system, but we are not allowed to do it because of the corporate role.

No one else understands the little things we do to conform just to have a job. They think I am wearing a suit and tie with an MBA, I am so perfect, no you are not you are the other side of the company “thats representation”.  No one cares about the tech behind it. I must be honest my work place doesn’t mess with me. I try to be professional in human interaction and clothes.

The next time you hire a hacker/or administrator get someone that has the real technological love that most hackers do. If not, you will be joining the ranks or the Equifax CIO and Uber. What a bunch of slackers.

By the way most Hackers will put in 60 to 80 hours a week, so learn to pay them.

A LinkedIn profile for Susan M. says she's served in the CSO role since 2013. She previously worked at First Data Corporation, Sun Trust Banks and HP. She studied music in college and earned her MFA from the University of Georgia.
Via "http://money.cnn.com/2017/09/15/news/equifax-top-executives-retiring/index.html"



#hack #hacktheworld #hacktheplanet #hack 

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Invite your Friends, Family and Community to Report Their Internet Speed.

Invite your Friends, Family and Community to Report Their Internet Speed.
Thank you again for submitting your information to the  Broadband Infrastructure Office's Speed Reporting Tool. 

Your speed information plays an important role in helping communities strategize and plan for their communities and to identify the areas that are unserved and underserved around the state. 

Now we would like to ask you to invite your friends, family and community to submit their speed information. 
How to Share
We wanted to make it as easy for you as possible to share. You can share it a few different ways. We invite you to do one or all of these.

Option 1: You can click here to forward this message to a friend

Option 2: You can share it on Facebook. 

Option 3: You can share in on Twitter.   

Thank you for helping us spread the word!          
About the Broadband Speed Reporting Tool
North Carolina will be better able to identify and address places that lack reliable internet service using a new tool launched today by the North Carolina Department of Information Technology's (DIT) Broadband Infrastructure Office. People will be able to use the new interactive mapping tool to report whether they have internet access at their home or business and determine the speeds received at their address.

The data provided by North Carolinians will be used to populate a map that will show the speed of internet services that households and businesses receive at locations across the state. This information is then used to report coverage data to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

Friday, September 29, 2017

Configuring Cisco Interfaces

I ran into a small issue the other day. I upgraded our network connections speed from our host, and I was not getting the speed I was suppose too. Turns out my ip-based switch port speed was throttled.
If you ever run into this change around the port speed on your router.




interface GigabitEthernet0/0
 switchport access vlan 2
 switchport mode access
 speed 100
 duplex full

Notice the highlighted speed in the config.

corerouter#config t
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
corerouter(config)#
corerouter(config)#interface GigabitEthernet0/0
corerouter(config)#speed auto 
ctrl+z
corerouter#wr
corerouter#reload



Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Getting To Know Powershell

First off Windows Domain Admins need to get really familiar with the Powershell Administration. 
Let's start off with a couple examples. By the way you can install the Windows PowerShell ISE in add and remove Windows options. 

Knowing what FSMO Roles about you AD environment.
Here is the script.

Retrieving Active Directory FSMO roles with PowerShell
$dom = [System.DirectoryServices.ActiveDirectory.Domain]::getcurrentdomain()
$dom | Format-List *
Transferring Active Directory FSMO roles with PowerShell
$dom = [System.DirectoryServices.ActiveDirectory.Domain]::getcurrentdomain()
$dc = $dom.FindDomainController()
$dc.TransferRoleOwnership(’PdcRole’)
$dc.TransferRoleOwnership(’InfrastructureRole’)
Raising Active Directory Domain and Forest functionality to Windows 2003 with PowerShell
$dom = [System.DirectoryServices.ActiveDirectory.Domain]::getcurrentdomain()
$dom.RaiseDomainFunctionality(’Windows2000NativeDomain’)
$dom.RaiseDomainFunctionality(’Windows2003Domain’)
Enabling and disabling a Global Catalog server with PowerShell
$for = [System.DirectoryServices.ActiveDirectory.Forest]::GetCurrentForest()
$gc = $for.FindGlobalCatalog()
$gc.DisableGlobalCatalog()
$gc.EnableGlobalCatalog()


Also if you are like me, I am always looking to clean up unneeded data on your WSUS server. 

#Region VARIABLES
 # WSUS Connection Parameters:
[String]$updateServer = "wsusserver.nrgnetworks.local"
[Boolean]$useSecureConnection = $False
[Int32]$portNumber = 80

# Cleanup Parameters:
# Decline updates that have not been approved for 30 days or more, are not currently needed by any clients, and are superseded by an aproved update.
[Boolean]$supersededUpdates = $True
# Decline updates that aren't approved and have been expired my Microsoft.
[Boolean]$expiredUpdates = $True
# Delete updates that are expired and have not been approved for 30 days or more.
[Boolean]$obsoleteUpdates = $True
# Delete older update revisions that have not been approved for 30 days or more.
[Boolean]$compressUpdates = $True
# Delete computers that have not contacted the server in 30 days or more.
[Boolean]$obsoleteComputers = $True
# Delete update files that aren't needed by updates or downstream servers.
[Boolean]$unneededContentFiles = $True

#EndRegion VARIABLES

#Region SCRIPT

# Load .NET assembly
[void][reflection.assembly]::LoadWithPartialName("Microsoft.UpdateServices.Administration")

# Connect to WSUS Server
$Wsus = [Microsoft.UpdateServices.Administration.AdminProxy]::getUpdateServer($updateServer,$useSecureConnection,$portNumber)

# Perform Cleanup
$CleanupManager = $Wsus.GetCleanupManager()
$CleanupScope = New-Object Microsoft.UpdateServices.Administration.CleanupScope($supersededUpdates,$expiredUpdates,$obsoleteUpdates,$compressUpdates,$obsoleteComputers,$unneededContentFiles)
$CleanupManager.PerformCleanup($CleanupScope)

#EndRegion SCRIPT


Cisco Show Commands

You will learn most information on your Cisco device will easy to gather from simple show commands. Everything from sessions to configs. Also Traffic Statistics for errors, or DDoS Attacks. 

Example
ciscoasa# show traffic
OUTSIDE:
        received (in 2395890.690 secs):
                317946819 packets       315525385708 bytes
                0 pkts/sec      131000 bytes/sec
        transmitted (in 2395890.690 secs):
                280139669 packets       79618073485 bytes
                0 pkts/sec      33001 bytes/sec
      1 minute input rate 218 pkts/sec,  142346 bytes/sec
      1 minute output rate 192 pkts/sec,  45133 bytes/sec
      1 minute drop rate, 7 pkts/sec
      5 minute input rate 164 pkts/sec,  109398 bytes/sec
      5 minute output rate 153 pkts/sec,  35406 bytes/sec
      5 minute drop rate, 6 pkts/sec
INSIDE:
        received (in 2395890.690 secs):
                255240733 packets       76128164260 bytes
                0 pkts/sec      31000 bytes/sec
        transmitted (in 2395890.690 secs):
                294891373 packets       247485048480 bytes
                1 pkts/sec      103001 bytes/sec
      1 minute input rate 196 pkts/sec,  44396 bytes/sec
      1 minute output rate 234 pkts/sec,  142469 bytes/sec
      1 minute drop rate, 5 pkts/sec
      5 minute input rate 158 pkts/sec,  35241 bytes/sec
      5 minute output rate 178 pkts/sec,  110074 bytes/sec
      5 minute drop rate, 4 pkts/sec
DMZ:
        received (in 2395890.690 secs):
                32384633 packets        2955292920 bytes
                0 pkts/sec      1000 bytes/sec
        transmitted (in 2395890.690 secs):
                49137094 packets        65615227653 bytes
                0 pkts/sec      27001 bytes/sec
      1 minute input rate 0 pkts/sec,  82 bytes/sec
      1 minute output rate 0 pkts/sec,  125 bytes/sec
      1 minute drop rate, 0 pkts/sec
      5 minute input rate 1 pkts/sec,  435 bytes/sec
      5 minute output rate 1 pkts/sec,  1075 bytes/sec
      5 minute drop rate, 0 pkts/sec
management:
        received (in 2395890.750 secs):
                14277133 packets        946118886 bytes
                0 pkts/sec      0 bytes/sec
        transmitted (in 2395890.750 secs):
                0 packets       0 bytes
                0 pkts/sec      0 bytes/sec
      1 minute input rate 5 pkts/sec,  424 bytes/sec
      1 minute output rate 0 pkts/sec,  0 bytes/sec
      1 minute drop rate, 0 pkts/sec
      5 minute input rate 6 pkts/sec,  407 bytes/sec
      5 minute output rate 0 pkts/sec,  0 bytes/sec
      5 minute drop rate, 0 pkts/sec
----------------------------------------
Aggregated Traffic on Physical Interface
----------------------------------------
GigabitEthernet0/0:
        received (in 2395890.790 secs):
                318032181 packets       321511281805 bytes
                0 pkts/sec      134000 bytes/sec
        transmitted (in 2395890.790 secs):
                280139730 packets       85167104894 bytes
                0 pkts/sec      35000 bytes/sec
      1 minute input rate 218 pkts/sec,  146592 bytes/sec
      1 minute output rate 192 pkts/sec,  49034 bytes/sec
      1 minute drop rate, 0 pkts/sec
      5 minute input rate 164 pkts/sec,  112593 bytes/sec
      5 minute output rate 153 pkts/sec,  38521 bytes/sec
      5 minute drop rate, 0 pkts/sec
GigabitEthernet0/1:
        received (in 2395890.810 secs):
                255241934 packets       81218647412 bytes
                0 pkts/sec      33001 bytes/sec
        transmitted (in 2395890.810 secs):
                294891391 packets       253102758608 bytes
                1 pkts/sec      105000 bytes/sec
      1 minute input rate 196 pkts/sec,  48364 bytes/sec
      1 minute output rate 234 pkts/sec,  146984 bytes/sec
      1 minute drop rate, 0 pkts/sec
      5 minute input rate 158 pkts/sec,  38456 bytes/sec
      5 minute output rate 178 pkts/sec,  113510 bytes/sec
      5 minute drop rate, 0 pkts/sec
GigabitEthernet0/2:
        received (in 2395890.850 secs):
                32384636 packets        3547413050 bytes
                0 pkts/sec      1000 bytes/sec
        transmitted (in 2395890.850 secs):
                49137094 packets        66502670016 bytes
                0 pkts/sec      27000 bytes/sec
      1 minute input rate 0 pkts/sec,  98 bytes/sec
      1 minute output rate 0 pkts/sec,  138 bytes/sec
      1 minute drop rate, 0 pkts/sec
      5 minute input rate 1 pkts/sec,  470 bytes/sec
      5 minute output rate 1 pkts/sec,  1108 bytes/sec
      5 minute drop rate, 0 pkts/sec
GigabitEthernet0/3:
        received (in 2395890.860 secs):
                14278281 packets        1203253101 bytes
                0 pkts/sec      0 bytes/sec
        transmitted (in 2395890.860 secs):
                0 packets       0 bytes
                0 pkts/sec      0 bytes/sec
      1 minute input rate 5 pkts/sec,  531 bytes/sec
      1 minute output rate 0 pkts/sec,  0 bytes/sec
      1 minute drop rate, 0 pkts/sec
      5 minute input rate 6 pkts/sec,  516 bytes/sec
      5 minute output rate 0 pkts/sec,  0 bytes/sec
      5 minute drop rate, 0 pkts/sec
GigabitEthernet0/4:
        received (in 2395890.900 secs):
                0 packets       0 bytes
                0 pkts/sec      0 bytes/sec
        transmitted (in 2395890.900 secs):
                0 packets       0 bytes
                0 pkts/sec      0 bytes/sec
      1 minute input rate 0 pkts/sec,  0 bytes/sec
      1 minute output rate 0 pkts/sec,  0 bytes/sec
      1 minute drop rate, 0 pkts/sec
      5 minute input rate 0 pkts/sec,  0 bytes/sec
      5 minute output rate 0 pkts/sec,  0 bytes/sec
      5 minute drop rate, 0 pkts/sec
GigabitEthernet0/5:
        received (in 2395890.910 secs):
                0 packets       0 bytes
                0 pkts/sec      0 bytes/sec
        transmitted (in 2395890.910 secs):
                0 packets       0 bytes
                0 pkts/sec      0 bytes/sec
      1 minute input rate 0 pkts/sec,  0 bytes/sec
      1 minute output rate 0 pkts/sec,  0 bytes/sec
      1 minute drop rate, 0 pkts/sec
      5 minute input rate 0 pkts/sec,  0 bytes/sec
      5 minute output rate 0 pkts/sec,  0 bytes/sec
      5 minute drop rate, 0 pkts/sec
Internal-Control0/0:
        received (in 2395890.950 secs):
                4813061 packets 348829320 bytes
                0 pkts/sec      0 bytes/sec
        transmitted (in 2395890.950 secs):
                5452144 packets 383499485 bytes
                0 pkts/sec      0 bytes/sec
      1 minute input rate 2 pkts/sec,  146 bytes/sec
      1 minute output rate 2 pkts/sec,  160 bytes/sec
      1 minute drop rate, 0 pkts/sec
      5 minute input rate 2 pkts/sec,  145 bytes/sec
      5 minute output rate 2 pkts/sec,  160 bytes/sec
      5 minute drop rate, 0 pkts/sec
Internal-Data0/0:
        received (in 2395890.960 secs):
                21248059 packets        1966209991 bytes
                1 pkts/sec      1 bytes/sec
        transmitted (in 2395890.960 secs):
                6170575 packets 958796353 bytes
                0 pkts/sec      0 bytes/sec
      1 minute input rate 8 pkts/sec,  850 bytes/sec
      1 minute output rate 2 pkts/sec,  402 bytes/sec
      1 minute drop rate, 0 pkts/sec
      5 minute input rate 8 pkts/sec,  836 bytes/sec
      5 minute output rate 2 pkts/sec,  403 bytes/sec
      5 minute drop rate, 0 pkts/sec
Internal-Data0/1:
        received (in 2395890.990 secs):
                603754038 packets       429853468179 bytes
                1 pkts/sec      179000 bytes/sec
        transmitted (in 2395890.990 secs):
                603754038 packets       429853468179 bytes
                1 pkts/sec      179000 bytes/sec
      1 minute input rate 397 pkts/sec,  209501 bytes/sec
      1 minute output rate 397 pkts/sec,  209501 bytes/sec
      1 minute drop rate, 0 pkts/sec
      5 minute input rate 313 pkts/sec,  164474 bytes/sec
      5 minute output rate 313 pkts/sec,  164474 bytes/sec
      5 minute drop rate, 0 pkts/sec
Internal-Data0/2:
        received (in 2395891.020 secs):
                6170575 packets 918208209 bytes
                0 pkts/sec      1 bytes/sec
        transmitted (in 2395891.020 secs):
                21248059 packets        1881217957 bytes
                1 pkts/sec      0 bytes/sec
      1 minute input rate 2 pkts/sec,  385 bytes/sec
      1 minute output rate 8 pkts/sec,  815 bytes/sec
      1 minute drop rate, 0 pkts/sec
      5 minute input rate 2 pkts/sec,  386 bytes/sec
      5 minute output rate 8 pkts/sec,  800 bytes/sec
      5 minute drop rate, 0 pkts/sec
Management0/0:
        received (in 2395891.040 secs):
                14278311 packets        1146069880 bytes
                0 pkts/sec      1 bytes/sec
        transmitted (in 2395891.040 secs):
                0 packets       0 bytes
                0 pkts/sec      0 bytes/sec
      1 minute input rate 5 pkts/sec,  507 bytes/sec
      1 minute output rate 0 pkts/sec,  0 bytes/sec
      1 minute drop rate, 0 pkts/sec
      5 minute input rate 6 pkts/sec,  492 bytes/sec
      5 minute output rate 0 pkts/sec,  0 bytes/sec
      5 minute drop rate, 0 pkts/sec
If you have a upgraded device with the security services you can even look at possible attacks against your network.  Such as;

ciscoasa# show threat-detection scanning-threat

and 

ciscoasa# show threat-detection statistics
Host:cicsoasa: tot-ses:30722 act-ses:5 fw-drop:0 insp-drop:0 null-ses:8 bad-acc:0
  1-hour Sent byte:                423             241       0           1523092
  1-hour Sent pkts:                  2               1       0              9023
  1-hour Recv byte:                  1               0       0              3632
  1-hour Recv pkts:                  0               0       0                48

Top 10 protected servers under attack (sorted by average rate)
Monitoring window size: 30 mins    Sampling interval: 30 secs

1    192.168.0.1:443 DMZ 0 0 39 172.16.42.6 (21 secs ago)