Saturday, July 28, 2012

Made in the USA?

You know I have been thinking about what our country makes to provide for our own people and companies. We don't make anything compared to other country's. We have sat here and let all our textiles and manufacturing move to other places because the government (Who has our best interests they think) we have let it happen.

We have gave them the power to ruin our country, because we are not smart enough to stop voting for Republican or Democrat. Grow up research it and vote for YOU. If you are broke living week to week don't blame anyone but yourself. The faster we cut ties with the corporations getting tax breaks and free trade with other countries we will be better off. We need (As the people of the USA) to support our small companies and and start manufacturing our own products.

Bring the companies back to the United States. Stop with allowing Mexico and China to take advantage of us because we are to lazy or want a large salary for a typical job. If you want to make 6 figures have an education to create, motivate, design, and engineer new products and solutions. If you do not want to take the time to learn and educate yourself then be happy with a regular job. Which I am not down playing you or your job because you want to spend time with family or want just a 9 to 5 job. There is nothing wrong with that.

We are loosing the American Dream and very fast. Stop with all the wars bring our men and women home, unless there is a realistic threat. Stop wasting our money on wars with no winners or losers. Put your money back into our country and innovation then we will be back on the right track.

I do not have the answers for all problems, but you as a government do not either, you vote and pass for the bottom line of your wallets. That is sad you are elected to protect us (The American People) but all you have done is put us fighting for our homes worrying about medical bills, worrying about foreclosures. Our government scares me I no longer trust them, and as a child I was taught they new the best thing for the US.

We have to take this country BACK for us.



Made in the USA?

You know I have been thinking about what our country makes to provide for our own people and companies. We don't make anything compared to other country's. We have sat here and let all our textiles and manufacturing move to other places because the government (Who has our best interests they think) we have let it happen.

We have gave them the power to ruin our country, because we are not smart enough to stop voting for Republican or Democrat. Grow up research it and vote for YOU. If you are broke living week to week don't blame anyone but yourself. The faster we cut ties with the corporations getting tax breaks and free trade with other countries we will be better off. We need (As the people of the USA) to support our small companies and and start manufacturing our own products.

Bring the companies back to the United States. Stop with allowing Mexico and China to take advantage of us because we are to lazy or want a large salary for a typical job. If you want to make 6 figures have an education to create, motivate, design, and engineer new products and solutions. If you do not want to take the time to learn and educate yourself then be happy with a regular job. Which I am not down playing you or your job because you want to spend time with family or want just a 9 to 5 job. There is nothing wrong with that.

We are loosing the American Dream and very fast. Stop with all the wars bring our men and women home, unless there is a realistic threat. Stop wasting our money on wars with no winners or losers. Put your money back into our country and innovation then we will be back on the right track.

I do not have the answers for all problems, but you as a government do not either, you vote and pass for the bottom line of your wallets. That is sad you are elected to protect us (The American People) but all you have done is put us fighting for our homes worrying about medical bills, worrying about foreclosures. Our government scares me I no longer trust them, and as a child I was taught they new the best thing for the US.

We have to take this country BACK for us.



Saturday, July 21, 2012

Site Update

After the events in Colorado I have been thinking about some of my posts and teachings, I deleted my dangerous chemicals and instructions on making such components. The way I think of it is that yes there are more websites with the same instructions, but mine is not going to be one to contribute to it. God Bless the family's that are having to live through this horrible tragedy.


Site Update

After the events in Colorado I have been thinking about some of my posts and teachings, I deleted my dangerous chemicals and instructions on making such components. The way I think of it is that yes there are more websites with the same instructions, but mine is not going to be one to contribute to it. God Bless the family's that are having to live through this horrible tragedy.


Thursday, July 5, 2012

Cooking Over a Fire

When you are cooking over a fire, there are a few things to remember. When you are able to think about these things as a system for cooking, you will automatically know what sort of pans and equipment will work on the fire.


If you sit a pan directly on the hot coals, your food will likely burn. If you hang your pan too far above the coals, it will not cook. If you try to cook over a fire instead of a bed of coals, you will be frustrated.
So what you need to work toward is a bed of hot coals, and a pan that is not too close nor too far away from the coals.

HOW close? Well, that depends on what you are cooking, and most of that knowledge will come with experience, however you can logically expect the coals to be hotter when you are closer to them :)

Obviously you will have to replenish your hot coals from time to time as you are cooking. So in your fireplace, choose a spot that is comfortable for you to reach to cook in, and another place to the side or rear of the fireplace to keep a fire going. I cook all along the front and one side of a fireplace, and allow the fire to burn in the left rear portion of the box. Whenever the coals burn out or loose some of their heat, scoop hot coals from the fire area to the cooking area. Some of the spent coals can be removed during cooking, but I usually wait 'until the cooking is over to do that.

There are many, many items that you could purchase to use for cooking in your fireplace, but here are my favorites:

Spyders - These are three or four legged trivet-like things that hold your pans above the coals. They have a ring for the pan to sit in and an open bottom. They can be purchased in varying heights so that you can cook close to the coals or several inches away from them. Three different heights would be ideal, but two would do. The really tall ones are great for keeping food warm.

If you equip your fireplace with a trammel or hanging arm, you can buy all kinds of do-dads to hang on it and hang your pots from. I like the one that adjusts from short to long so you can adjust how quickly your food is cooking without moving the pot off the fire. This is especially handy if your fireplace is small and you are cramped for room in there.

Utensils - My very longest ones are 18". Also consider getting cast iron utensils instead of stainless or wooden ones. They just last longer. You need a spoon, a slotted spoon, a fork or three of various sizes, two spatulas, one short and one long, and that's all that is really essential. As you cook more and more you will find that there are other utensils that you would like to have. Choose very sturdy ones, for you will find that you use them for lifting Dutch Oven lids, pots and pans and other heavy items out of the fire. I finally got a utensil that is nothing more than a big hook to do just that!


You might want a split to roast meat on, but I bind the meat up with cotton thread, season it and hang over slow coals for about 6-8 hours to roast. Works well, if you can stand the aroma for that long! Another good way to roast meat like venison steaks, is to skewer the meat onto a large fork and prop the fork up in front of the fire, turning frequently 'until the meat is done.

There are reflector ovens made for the fireplace and they are really great.....once you learn how to use them properly, and that takes practice. They can be used to cook meats, breads, cakes, cookies, or casseroles. They are relatively slow cooking, but they do the job very well, as soon as you learn how to keep the coals at an even temperature and how to pull the oven back from the fire when it becomes too hot.

There are also Dutch Ovens. I recommend one with a lid that has a lip on it so that you can put hot coals on top of it without them sliding off. The coals on the top of the lid helps the food to cook from both the top and bottom of the pan, much the way a conventional oven does. This is the best way to bake in the fireplace, besides the reflector oven. You want Dutch Ovens that have LEGS. You will need at a minimum of three Dutch Ovens to cook a large meal. They can be used to cook cakes, cornbreads, puddings, soups, stews, roasts, on and on.....The trick is to keep the pan moving every ____ minutes. You will fill in the blank as you are more experienced, but I find that I like to move my Dutch Oven around and reposition it with new coals every 5-15 minutes. It's very easy to burn a cake in a Dutch Oven...How do I know? Oh....never mind.

Other Pots and Pans - Well, just get cast iron and make sure that they all have LEGS on them! You want the coals to be able to get up under the pans to cook the food, this way you don't have to sit the pan ON the coals and risk burning. Make sure they have handles, Dutch Ovens are my favorite.

You will need a safe place to sit hot pans coming off the fire, lots of dish towels and all of the usual fireplace accoutrements like a shovel, ash bucket, bucket of water for emergencies, poker.

You will need a large pan or tray to place your utensils on while you are using them.

One last thing I have learned about cooking over a fire. When I am pushed for time and I have hungry people to cook for I have to use higher heat and therefore more grease in my cooking. However, if you are not pressed for time and you can relax a bit, you can cook with lower temperature coals and use less grease. This may not seem important now, but as you cook on the fire more and more you will catch yourself adding more grease to whatever you are cooking because the temp. is too high.

You are going to have to grease the pans a lot more than you are probably used to doing anyway with conventional cooking, especially considering our low fat ways these days. But as you become more experienced, you can cut back on the grease considerably.

Cooking Over a Fire

When you are cooking over a fire, there are a few things to remember. When you are able to think about these things as a system for cooking, you will automatically know what sort of pans and equipment will work on the fire.


If you sit a pan directly on the hot coals, your food will likely burn. If you hang your pan too far above the coals, it will not cook. If you try to cook over a fire instead of a bed of coals, you will be frustrated.
So what you need to work toward is a bed of hot coals, and a pan that is not too close nor too far away from the coals.

HOW close? Well, that depends on what you are cooking, and most of that knowledge will come with experience, however you can logically expect the coals to be hotter when you are closer to them :)

Obviously you will have to replenish your hot coals from time to time as you are cooking. So in your fireplace, choose a spot that is comfortable for you to reach to cook in, and another place to the side or rear of the fireplace to keep a fire going. I cook all along the front and one side of a fireplace, and allow the fire to burn in the left rear portion of the box. Whenever the coals burn out or loose some of their heat, scoop hot coals from the fire area to the cooking area. Some of the spent coals can be removed during cooking, but I usually wait 'until the cooking is over to do that.

There are many, many items that you could purchase to use for cooking in your fireplace, but here are my favorites:

Spyders - These are three or four legged trivet-like things that hold your pans above the coals. They have a ring for the pan to sit in and an open bottom. They can be purchased in varying heights so that you can cook close to the coals or several inches away from them. Three different heights would be ideal, but two would do. The really tall ones are great for keeping food warm.

If you equip your fireplace with a trammel or hanging arm, you can buy all kinds of do-dads to hang on it and hang your pots from. I like the one that adjusts from short to long so you can adjust how quickly your food is cooking without moving the pot off the fire. This is especially handy if your fireplace is small and you are cramped for room in there.

Utensils - My very longest ones are 18". Also consider getting cast iron utensils instead of stainless or wooden ones. They just last longer. You need a spoon, a slotted spoon, a fork or three of various sizes, two spatulas, one short and one long, and that's all that is really essential. As you cook more and more you will find that there are other utensils that you would like to have. Choose very sturdy ones, for you will find that you use them for lifting Dutch Oven lids, pots and pans and other heavy items out of the fire. I finally got a utensil that is nothing more than a big hook to do just that!


You might want a split to roast meat on, but I bind the meat up with cotton thread, season it and hang over slow coals for about 6-8 hours to roast. Works well, if you can stand the aroma for that long! Another good way to roast meat like venison steaks, is to skewer the meat onto a large fork and prop the fork up in front of the fire, turning frequently 'until the meat is done.

There are reflector ovens made for the fireplace and they are really great.....once you learn how to use them properly, and that takes practice. They can be used to cook meats, breads, cakes, cookies, or casseroles. They are relatively slow cooking, but they do the job very well, as soon as you learn how to keep the coals at an even temperature and how to pull the oven back from the fire when it becomes too hot.

There are also Dutch Ovens. I recommend one with a lid that has a lip on it so that you can put hot coals on top of it without them sliding off. The coals on the top of the lid helps the food to cook from both the top and bottom of the pan, much the way a conventional oven does. This is the best way to bake in the fireplace, besides the reflector oven. You want Dutch Ovens that have LEGS. You will need at a minimum of three Dutch Ovens to cook a large meal. They can be used to cook cakes, cornbreads, puddings, soups, stews, roasts, on and on.....The trick is to keep the pan moving every ____ minutes. You will fill in the blank as you are more experienced, but I find that I like to move my Dutch Oven around and reposition it with new coals every 5-15 minutes. It's very easy to burn a cake in a Dutch Oven...How do I know? Oh....never mind.

Other Pots and Pans - Well, just get cast iron and make sure that they all have LEGS on them! You want the coals to be able to get up under the pans to cook the food, this way you don't have to sit the pan ON the coals and risk burning. Make sure they have handles, Dutch Ovens are my favorite.

You will need a safe place to sit hot pans coming off the fire, lots of dish towels and all of the usual fireplace accoutrements like a shovel, ash bucket, bucket of water for emergencies, poker.

You will need a large pan or tray to place your utensils on while you are using them.

One last thing I have learned about cooking over a fire. When I am pushed for time and I have hungry people to cook for I have to use higher heat and therefore more grease in my cooking. However, if you are not pressed for time and you can relax a bit, you can cook with lower temperature coals and use less grease. This may not seem important now, but as you cook on the fire more and more you will catch yourself adding more grease to whatever you are cooking because the temp. is too high.

You are going to have to grease the pans a lot more than you are probably used to doing anyway with conventional cooking, especially considering our low fat ways these days. But as you become more experienced, you can cut back on the grease considerably.

Wednesday, July 4, 2012

Mobile Survival Gear

I try to stick with one brand of knives and tools. It is easier to keep up with most of tools and knives have a lifetime warranty (plus it helps me with my ocd). I use mostly Gerber everything. I really like the Bear Grylls survival series but I also use a variety of the Gerber Gear. If you are looking at making a kit for your car or truck here is a list of what I keep in my truck.

1. Gerber & Bear Grylls Ultimate Kit
2. Sportz Avalanche Truck Tent III
3. Gerber & Bear Grylls Ultimate Survival Pack with Multitool, Flashlight, and Fire Starter
4. Bridgestone and Travel Road Safety Kit with Carry Case
5. Gerber & Bear Grylls Survival Series Parang, With Nylon Sheath
6. Gerber & Bear Grylls Canteen Water Bottle with Cooking Cup
7. Cabala's Big Mouth Fishing Rod and Zebco 808 Reel
8. OD Wool Blanket -US Army Style x2
9. Adventure Medical Kit Outfitter Kit
10. Stormtech - Packable Rain Poncho (PCX-1)
11. Datrex 3600 Emergency Food Bar


If I am going to the woods or new territory I also carry a .22 with 100 rounds of ammo.

This sounds like a lot but it takes up very little space. You can find most of these items on www.gerbergear.com or www.amazon.com.

-Gary

Mobile Survival Gear

I try to stick with one brand of knives and tools. It is easier to keep up with most of tools and knives have a lifetime warranty (plus it helps me with my ocd). I use mostly Gerber everything. I really like the Bear Grylls survival series but I also use a variety of the Gerber Gear. If you are looking at making a kit for your car or truck here is a list of what I keep in my truck.

1. Gerber & Bear Grylls Ultimate Kit
2. Sportz Avalanche Truck Tent III
3. Gerber & Bear Grylls Ultimate Survival Pack with Multitool, Flashlight, and Fire Starter
4. Bridgestone and Travel Road Safety Kit with Carry Case
5. Gerber & Bear Grylls Survival Series Parang, With Nylon Sheath
6. Gerber & Bear Grylls Canteen Water Bottle with Cooking Cup
7. Cabala's Big Mouth Fishing Rod and Zebco 808 Reel
8. OD Wool Blanket -US Army Style x2
9. Adventure Medical Kit Outfitter Kit
10. Stormtech - Packable Rain Poncho (PCX-1)
11. Datrex 3600 Emergency Food Bar


If I am going to the woods or new territory I also carry a .22 with 100 rounds of ammo.

This sounds like a lot but it takes up very little space. You can find most of these items on www.gerbergear.com or www.amazon.com.

-Gary