Thursday, May 29, 2014

Fraud Alert: Online Video Ads Scrutinized



LOS ANGELES — As online video ads become increasingly important components of today’s advertising ecosystem for both adult and mainstream companies, a growing number of criminal scam artists seek to steal countless Dollars, Euros and Yen flowing through ad networks and exchanges — using automation, deception and fraud to carry out their crimes.

It is a digital version of the classic “shell game,” where you pay your money and hope to guess which of three walnut shells has a pea hiding under it — while a huckster uses sleight of hand to hide the truth. Except in this case, the pea is a targeted website visitor and the shell is the website that you are paying to run your advertising on. The huckster of course is the advertising network that you contracted with and the empty shells are just that — bogus websites that do not contain real visitors but which you pay good money for in hopes that you will find the desired pea lurking under that specific shell. In both the real and virtual versions of this “game,” not paying close attention is a fast way to lose all your money.

According to a report from comScore, fraud is the elephant in the digital room, forming an undeniably large and growing problem for online advertising, with an average of 0.16 percent of impressions across all campaigns delivered to non-human agents. While this percentage seems negligible, the report covers only basic forms of inappropriate delivery — and with nearly $50 billion in yearly digital ad sales in the U.S. alone, it means that fraudulent online ads cost U.S. businesses around $800 million in annual losses.

When including sophisticated types of fraud, these numbers grow quickly, making fraud an important concern for all advertisers. In fact, the comScore study shows little to no correlation between the cost per thousand visitors (CPM — a common metric for ad buys), and the value delivered to the advertiser.

“For example, ad placements with strong in-view rates are not getting higher CPMs than placements with low in-view rates. Similarly, ads that are doing well at delivering to a primary demographic target are not receiving more value than those that are not,” the comScore report notes. “In other words, neither ad visibility nor the quality of the audience reached is currently reflected in the economics of digital advertising.”

To make it simpler, when buying ads you are often not getting what you hope or think you are.

Source and Full Story Here: http://newswire.xbiz.com/view.php?id=179697

Fraud Alert: Online Video Ads Scrutinized



LOS ANGELES — As online video ads become increasingly important components of today’s advertising ecosystem for both adult and mainstream companies, a growing number of criminal scam artists seek to steal countless Dollars, Euros and Yen flowing through ad networks and exchanges — using automation, deception and fraud to carry out their crimes.

It is a digital version of the classic “shell game,” where you pay your money and hope to guess which of three walnut shells has a pea hiding under it — while a huckster uses sleight of hand to hide the truth. Except in this case, the pea is a targeted website visitor and the shell is the website that you are paying to run your advertising on. The huckster of course is the advertising network that you contracted with and the empty shells are just that — bogus websites that do not contain real visitors but which you pay good money for in hopes that you will find the desired pea lurking under that specific shell. In both the real and virtual versions of this “game,” not paying close attention is a fast way to lose all your money.

According to a report from comScore, fraud is the elephant in the digital room, forming an undeniably large and growing problem for online advertising, with an average of 0.16 percent of impressions across all campaigns delivered to non-human agents. While this percentage seems negligible, the report covers only basic forms of inappropriate delivery — and with nearly $50 billion in yearly digital ad sales in the U.S. alone, it means that fraudulent online ads cost U.S. businesses around $800 million in annual losses.

When including sophisticated types of fraud, these numbers grow quickly, making fraud an important concern for all advertisers. In fact, the comScore study shows little to no correlation between the cost per thousand visitors (CPM — a common metric for ad buys), and the value delivered to the advertiser.

“For example, ad placements with strong in-view rates are not getting higher CPMs than placements with low in-view rates. Similarly, ads that are doing well at delivering to a primary demographic target are not receiving more value than those that are not,” the comScore report notes. “In other words, neither ad visibility nor the quality of the audience reached is currently reflected in the economics of digital advertising.”

To make it simpler, when buying ads you are often not getting what you hope or think you are.

Source and Full Story Here: http://newswire.xbiz.com/view.php?id=179697

N.C. A&T foundation employee charged with embezzlement



GREENSBORO — An employee of the N.C. A&T University Foundation has been charged with embezzling about $400,000 from the organization over a three-year period.

The N.C. A&T University Foundation announced that Shirlye Cornelia Grandy, its former director of accounting, was charged today with embezzlement, obtaining property by false pretenses, corporate malfeasance and computer fraud.

Grandy, 50, was released on a written promise to appear in court, according to Greensboro police.

The foundation's interim director Shirley Frye stated the following in a news release:

“In December, the Foundation discovered accounting discrepancies and immediately launched an investigation with help from outside counsel. We found that Ms. Grandy had misappropriated funds from an operating account to her personal account. As a result, we terminated Ms. Grandy, contacted the Greensboro police and hired a Big Four accounting firm to help us determine exactly what happened.

N.C. A&T foundation employee charged with embezzlement



GREENSBORO — An employee of the N.C. A&T University Foundation has been charged with embezzling about $400,000 from the organization over a three-year period.

The N.C. A&T University Foundation announced that Shirlye Cornelia Grandy, its former director of accounting, was charged today with embezzlement, obtaining property by false pretenses, corporate malfeasance and computer fraud.

Grandy, 50, was released on a written promise to appear in court, according to Greensboro police.

The foundation's interim director Shirley Frye stated the following in a news release:

“In December, the Foundation discovered accounting discrepancies and immediately launched an investigation with help from outside counsel. We found that Ms. Grandy had misappropriated funds from an operating account to her personal account. As a result, we terminated Ms. Grandy, contacted the Greensboro police and hired a Big Four accounting firm to help us determine exactly what happened.

Durham-based company develops app to track fraud



DURHAM, N.C. (AP) — By snapping a picture with his mobile phone, Hersh Tapadia demonstrated how an app developed by the Durham-based anti-counterfeiting technology company CertiRx Corp. could find fraudulent changes on a prescription drug label.

Within minutes, Tapadia, who is CertiRx's co-founder and product development director, had a screen pulled up to show how the app could find and highlight counterfeit areas on an example drug label using a deep pink color.

The start-up is working to build a business around marking drug packages, pills, and academic documents for fraud detection and prevention. And it's also trying to win grant money to continue work on a technology that they're developing to mark pills or other products with small particles integrated into the drug's surface or mixed into its formulation.

"We think, on its face, if law-abiding people know substances are traceable (they'll) handle them more carefully," said CertiRx Corp.'s president and CEO Thomas J. Mercolino, who is another one of the company's three co-founders whose background includes work for the medical technology company Becton, Dickinson and Co. and at Johnson & Johnson.

Durham-based company develops app to track fraud



DURHAM, N.C. (AP) — By snapping a picture with his mobile phone, Hersh Tapadia demonstrated how an app developed by the Durham-based anti-counterfeiting technology company CertiRx Corp. could find fraudulent changes on a prescription drug label.

Within minutes, Tapadia, who is CertiRx's co-founder and product development director, had a screen pulled up to show how the app could find and highlight counterfeit areas on an example drug label using a deep pink color.

The start-up is working to build a business around marking drug packages, pills, and academic documents for fraud detection and prevention. And it's also trying to win grant money to continue work on a technology that they're developing to mark pills or other products with small particles integrated into the drug's surface or mixed into its formulation.

"We think, on its face, if law-abiding people know substances are traceable (they'll) handle them more carefully," said CertiRx Corp.'s president and CEO Thomas J. Mercolino, who is another one of the company's three co-founders whose background includes work for the medical technology company Becton, Dickinson and Co. and at Johnson & Johnson.

Leland woman says she lost $5,400 in jury duty phone scam



LELAND, NC (WWAY) -- A 63-year-old woman says she is still shaken up after a man fooled her out of thousands of dollars.

She is not the first victim to fall prey to this scam that now has the attention of federal investigators.

The woman, who did not want to go on camera, says a man called her claiming to be a sheriff's deputy saying that she had missed jury duty and had an active warrant out for her arrest. She says the caller told her if she paid $2,700, she would be free from the warrant and clear of any further charges.

The victim says she agreed to pay and says the caller told her to go to a nearby Rite Aid to buy prepaid credit cards to do it. The woman says she bought the wrong cards at first, so she went back and spent another $2,700 on the right ones.

The victim says she thinks the man who called her targeted her based on information from her late husband's obituary.

Leland woman says she lost $5,400 in jury duty phone scam



LELAND, NC (WWAY) -- A 63-year-old woman says she is still shaken up after a man fooled her out of thousands of dollars.

She is not the first victim to fall prey to this scam that now has the attention of federal investigators.

The woman, who did not want to go on camera, says a man called her claiming to be a sheriff's deputy saying that she had missed jury duty and had an active warrant out for her arrest. She says the caller told her if she paid $2,700, she would be free from the warrant and clear of any further charges.

The victim says she agreed to pay and says the caller told her to go to a nearby Rite Aid to buy prepaid credit cards to do it. The woman says she bought the wrong cards at first, so she went back and spent another $2,700 on the right ones.

The victim says she thinks the man who called her targeted her based on information from her late husband's obituary.

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

FBI agent to investigate fraud for NC elections board



RALEIGH, N.C. — A veteran FBI agent will join the State Board of Elections next month to assist in voter fraud and campaign finance investigations, officials said Tuesday.

Chuck Stuber has worked for the FBI for 28 years, serving in Washington, D.C., Denver and Raleigh. He was involved in investigations of former Gov. Mike Easley and former House Speaker Jim Black, both of which ended in convictions.

The elections board said last month that it would investigate cases of possible voter fraud identified by an interstate cross-check comparing election records from 28 states.

"I am honored to join the State Board of Elections during this important time,” Stuber said in a statement. “I have deep respect for those within the agency and look forward to working with them to enforce our state’s election laws."

The Raleigh native is both a lawyer and a certified public accountant, with degrees from North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina School of Law.

FBI agent to investigate fraud for NC elections board



RALEIGH, N.C. — A veteran FBI agent will join the State Board of Elections next month to assist in voter fraud and campaign finance investigations, officials said Tuesday.

Chuck Stuber has worked for the FBI for 28 years, serving in Washington, D.C., Denver and Raleigh. He was involved in investigations of former Gov. Mike Easley and former House Speaker Jim Black, both of which ended in convictions.

The elections board said last month that it would investigate cases of possible voter fraud identified by an interstate cross-check comparing election records from 28 states.

"I am honored to join the State Board of Elections during this important time,” Stuber said in a statement. “I have deep respect for those within the agency and look forward to working with them to enforce our state’s election laws."

The Raleigh native is both a lawyer and a certified public accountant, with degrees from North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina School of Law.

Friday, May 23, 2014

Goldsboro woman pleads guilty to wire fraud



RALEIGH, N.C. -A Goldsboro woman pled guilty to wire fraud in front of a federal judge on Thursday.

The U.S. Attorney General, Thomas G. Walker, announced that 57-year-old Hilda Parker is facing up to 20 years in prison for falsely verifying the shipment of good to the Defense and Logistics Agency.

Parker, the owner and operator of Parker Products awarded 217 purchase orders from the DLA between April 2007 and December 2007. Of those 217 orders, the company failed to deliver the goods from 29 of those orders.

The payment was made possible due to a streamlined fast-pay purchase system, which allowed Parker to receive payment on the verification of the shipment rather that the receipt of the goods.

Goldsboro woman pleads guilty to wire fraud



RALEIGH, N.C. -A Goldsboro woman pled guilty to wire fraud in front of a federal judge on Thursday.

The U.S. Attorney General, Thomas G. Walker, announced that 57-year-old Hilda Parker is facing up to 20 years in prison for falsely verifying the shipment of good to the Defense and Logistics Agency.

Parker, the owner and operator of Parker Products awarded 217 purchase orders from the DLA between April 2007 and December 2007. Of those 217 orders, the company failed to deliver the goods from 29 of those orders.

The payment was made possible due to a streamlined fast-pay purchase system, which allowed Parker to receive payment on the verification of the shipment rather that the receipt of the goods.

Thursday, May 22, 2014

USF Police issue fraud alert for students



Tampa, Florida -- The University of South Florida Police Department says it has received several reports of students allowing individuals to use their bank account and/or have access to their ATM card and PIN number.

Police say the suspects will approach a student and ask the student to use their account to deposit a check claiming that they don't have access to a bank account themselves and need to cash a check. They will then offer the student a ride to the ATM, and upon arrival, deposit the stolen/fraudulent checks into the student's account and withdraw funds. Later, these checks are determined to be stolen/fraudulent and the student suffers a financial loss.

It is unknown whether these two suspects are associated, or working independently. The first suspect is a man last seen driving a red Mazda SUV. The second suspect is a woman last seen driving a white SUV.

USF Police issue fraud alert for students



Tampa, Florida -- The University of South Florida Police Department says it has received several reports of students allowing individuals to use their bank account and/or have access to their ATM card and PIN number.

Police say the suspects will approach a student and ask the student to use their account to deposit a check claiming that they don't have access to a bank account themselves and need to cash a check. They will then offer the student a ride to the ATM, and upon arrival, deposit the stolen/fraudulent checks into the student's account and withdraw funds. Later, these checks are determined to be stolen/fraudulent and the student suffers a financial loss.

It is unknown whether these two suspects are associated, or working independently. The first suspect is a man last seen driving a red Mazda SUV. The second suspect is a woman last seen driving a white SUV.

Tuesday, May 20, 2014

Beginners Guide to e-Vapor or Electronic Cigarettes

First off, I never thought I would have stopped smoking cigarettes. I lack the self drive and willpower. Plus my temper would ignite with out the nicotine.

So I gave it a few years to let the technology evolve. I didn't want to be on the cutting edge of this new solution.

I finally have been without smoking cigarettes for 6 months without the withdraws or the terrible side effects of it always being on my mind.

I bought Blu to begin with but the taste or hit from it didn't do anything for me. I finally decided to do more research. I discovered a company called iTazte. So I for purchased the starter kit from http://www.mtbakervapor.com/. I purchased the Innokin iTaste VV V3.0 Starter Kit.

They helped me make the correct purchases, for the cantorizers and vapor solution. Also sent me a couple of there custom mixes. My favorite by far is there Hawk Sauce with a hint of Candy Cain. 

Then my wife wanted to try it, she was a chain smoker so I thought well I am not for sure it is going to work for her, but slowly she stopped and went to using vapor as well. I then purchased a iTazte MVP with a iClear 30 cantorizor for myself and wife. 

I love the machines so much I purchased a iTazte 134. I love all of these machines. So recommend you try different mixers and flavors to you hit on what you like best. 

So for an on the go I would have to say get a iTaste VV 3.0 starter kit. Also for the cantorizor iClear 30 works the best for me. Make sure to purchase a main machine and slim line that way you are never without your vaporizer. Also keep parts around for your machine. My recommendations are below, one more thing you might want to start slowly winging yourself off of the nicotine slowly. It WORKS!

iTazte v3.0

iClear 30 - I would have 2 of these on hand.

iTazte MVP 2.0

iTazte 134

iClear Replacement Head - I would get a couple packs of 11




Beginners Guide to e-Vapor or Electronic Cigarettes

First off, I never thought I would have stopped smoking cigarettes. I lack the self drive and willpower. Plus my temper would ignite with out the nicotine.

So I gave it a few years to let the technology evolve. I didn't want to be on the cutting edge of this new solution.

I finally have been without smoking cigarettes for 6 months without the withdraws or the terrible side effects of it always being on my mind.

I bought Blu to begin with but the taste or hit from it didn't do anything for me. I finally decided to do more research. I discovered a company called iTazte. So I for purchased the starter kit from http://www.mtbakervapor.com/. I purchased the Innokin iTaste VV V3.0 Starter Kit.

They helped me make the correct purchases, for the cantorizers and vapor solution. Also sent me a couple of there custom mixes. My favorite by far is there Hawk Sauce with a hint of Candy Cain. 

Then my wife wanted to try it, she was a chain smoker so I thought well I am not for sure it is going to work for her, but slowly she stopped and went to using vapor as well. I then purchased a iTazte MVP with a iClear 30 cantorizor for myself and wife. 

I love the machines so much I purchased a iTazte 134. I love all of these machines. So recommend you try different mixers and flavors to you hit on what you like best. 

So for an on the go I would have to say get a iTaste VV 3.0 starter kit. Also for the cantorizor iClear 30 works the best for me. Make sure to purchase a main machine and slim line that way you are never without your vaporizer. Also keep parts around for your machine. My recommendations are below, one more thing you might want to start slowly winging yourself off of the nicotine slowly. It WORKS!

iTazte v3.0

iClear 30 - I would have 2 of these on hand.

iTazte MVP 2.0

iTazte 134

iClear Replacement Head - I would get a couple packs of 11




4 busted in $250K Greenville fraud investigation



GREENVILLE, N.C. -Four people, including a husband and wife are in jail facing fraud charges after a 2-year investigation into a Greenville eye care center.

Greenville police say Sabrina Fontana of Winterville spent five years converting money coming into Eastern Carolina Eye Center to boost her own office manager salary and benefits.

Officers say she also used the company credit card to buy nearly $160,000 worth of personal items.

4 busted in $250K Greenville fraud investigation



GREENVILLE, N.C. -Four people, including a husband and wife are in jail facing fraud charges after a 2-year investigation into a Greenville eye care center.

Greenville police say Sabrina Fontana of Winterville spent five years converting money coming into Eastern Carolina Eye Center to boost her own office manager salary and benefits.

Officers say she also used the company credit card to buy nearly $160,000 worth of personal items.

US cyber-thief gets 20-year jail term



A US cyber-thief who helped run a website that dealt in stolen credit cards has been jailed for 20 years.

David Ray Camez was one of the key members of the carder.su website that was shut down in 2010 by US law enforcement authorities.

Initially sentenced to seven years in jail, Camez's term was lengthened after he was found guilty of breaking US racketeering laws.

In addition, he has been ordered to pay $20m (£11.9m) in damages.

"Camez was a member of a vast criminal organization that facilitated rampant cyber fraud throughout the world," said the US Department of Justice in a statement. The jail sentence is believed to be one of the longest ever handed to a computer criminal.

Camez and his co-conspirators used Carder.su to traffic stolen payment cards and identities, said the DoJ. Agents from the Homeland Security Investigations unit infiltrated the site prior to it being shut down.

About 5,500 people were regular users and members of Carder.su, it said, adding that these people are believed to have carried out card crime that caused about $50m in losses for many different card and payment firms.

Source and Full Story Here: http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-27472244

US cyber-thief gets 20-year jail term



A US cyber-thief who helped run a website that dealt in stolen credit cards has been jailed for 20 years.

David Ray Camez was one of the key members of the carder.su website that was shut down in 2010 by US law enforcement authorities.

Initially sentenced to seven years in jail, Camez's term was lengthened after he was found guilty of breaking US racketeering laws.

In addition, he has been ordered to pay $20m (£11.9m) in damages.

"Camez was a member of a vast criminal organization that facilitated rampant cyber fraud throughout the world," said the US Department of Justice in a statement. The jail sentence is believed to be one of the longest ever handed to a computer criminal.

Camez and his co-conspirators used Carder.su to traffic stolen payment cards and identities, said the DoJ. Agents from the Homeland Security Investigations unit infiltrated the site prior to it being shut down.

About 5,500 people were regular users and members of Carder.su, it said, adding that these people are believed to have carried out card crime that caused about $50m in losses for many different card and payment firms.

Source and Full Story Here: http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-27472244

Monday, May 19, 2014

U.S. Charges Five Chinese Military Hackers for Cyber Espionage Against U.S. Corporations and a Labor Organization for Commercial Advantage



First Time Criminal Charges Are Filed Against Known State Actors for Hacking

A grand jury in the Western District of Pennsylvania (WDPA) indicted five Chinese military hackers for computer hacking, economic espionage and other offenses directed at six American victims in the U.S. nuclear power, metals and solar products industries.

The indictment alleges that the defendants conspired to hack into American entities, to maintain unauthorized access to their computers and to steal information from those entities that would be useful to their competitors in China, including state-owned enterprises (SOEs). In some cases, it alleges, the conspirators stole trade secrets that would have been particularly beneficial to Chinese companies at the time they were stolen. In other cases, it alleges, the conspirators also stole sensitive, internal communications that would provide a competitor, or an adversary in litigation, with insight into the strategy and vulnerabilities of the American entity.

“This is a case alleging economic espionage by members of the Chinese military and represents the first ever charges against a state actor for this type of hacking,” U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said. “The range of trade secrets and other sensitive business information stolen in this case is significant and demands an aggressive response. Success in the global market place should be based solely on a company’s ability to innovate and compete, not on a sponsor government’s ability to spy and steal business secrets. This Administration will not tolerate actions by any nation that seeks to illegally sabotage American companies and undermine the integrity of fair competition in the operation of the free market.”

U.S. Charges Five Chinese Military Hackers for Cyber Espionage Against U.S. Corporations and a Labor Organization for Commercial Advantage



First Time Criminal Charges Are Filed Against Known State Actors for Hacking

A grand jury in the Western District of Pennsylvania (WDPA) indicted five Chinese military hackers for computer hacking, economic espionage and other offenses directed at six American victims in the U.S. nuclear power, metals and solar products industries.

The indictment alleges that the defendants conspired to hack into American entities, to maintain unauthorized access to their computers and to steal information from those entities that would be useful to their competitors in China, including state-owned enterprises (SOEs). In some cases, it alleges, the conspirators stole trade secrets that would have been particularly beneficial to Chinese companies at the time they were stolen. In other cases, it alleges, the conspirators also stole sensitive, internal communications that would provide a competitor, or an adversary in litigation, with insight into the strategy and vulnerabilities of the American entity.

“This is a case alleging economic espionage by members of the Chinese military and represents the first ever charges against a state actor for this type of hacking,” U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said. “The range of trade secrets and other sensitive business information stolen in this case is significant and demands an aggressive response. Success in the global market place should be based solely on a company’s ability to innovate and compete, not on a sponsor government’s ability to spy and steal business secrets. This Administration will not tolerate actions by any nation that seeks to illegally sabotage American companies and undermine the integrity of fair competition in the operation of the free market.”

Richard Scrushy to Speak at the 2014 Fraud & Forensic Investigations Conference at Pfeiffer University



>PRWEB.COM Newswire

Houston, TX (PRWEB) May 19, 2014

7venth Power is pleased to announce that its President Richard Scrushy has been invited to speak as the Morning Keynote speaker at Pfeiffer University's 2014 Fraud & Forensic investigations conference meeting at The Westin Charlotte Hotel, 601 South College Street, Charlotte, NC, on June 10 – 11, 2014. He will talk about his experiences in building billion dollar companies and the problems that caused an accounting fraud at one of his companies. Included in his discussion will be the high profile investigations and trials brought by the United States government.

Established in 1885, Pfeiffer University is a globally engaged, regional university distinctive for its transformational undergraduate experiences and leadership in professional and graduate programs that fill demonstrated needs on its campuses in Charlotte, Misenheimer, Raleigh and online. Vested in its history as a United Methodist-related university and propelled by an innovative faculty and staff, Pfeiffer prepares its students for a lifetime of achievement, scholarship, spirituality and service.

Richard Scrushy is a dynamic entrepreneur with a strong track record. He was a founder of three New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) companies. All three became billion dollar companies, and two became Fortune 500 companies.

Source and Full Story Here: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/1925342

Richard Scrushy to Speak at the 2014 Fraud & Forensic Investigations Conference at Pfeiffer University



>PRWEB.COM Newswire

Houston, TX (PRWEB) May 19, 2014

7venth Power is pleased to announce that its President Richard Scrushy has been invited to speak as the Morning Keynote speaker at Pfeiffer University's 2014 Fraud & Forensic investigations conference meeting at The Westin Charlotte Hotel, 601 South College Street, Charlotte, NC, on June 10 – 11, 2014. He will talk about his experiences in building billion dollar companies and the problems that caused an accounting fraud at one of his companies. Included in his discussion will be the high profile investigations and trials brought by the United States government.

Established in 1885, Pfeiffer University is a globally engaged, regional university distinctive for its transformational undergraduate experiences and leadership in professional and graduate programs that fill demonstrated needs on its campuses in Charlotte, Misenheimer, Raleigh and online. Vested in its history as a United Methodist-related university and propelled by an innovative faculty and staff, Pfeiffer prepares its students for a lifetime of achievement, scholarship, spirituality and service.

Richard Scrushy is a dynamic entrepreneur with a strong track record. He was a founder of three New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) companies. All three became billion dollar companies, and two became Fortune 500 companies.

Source and Full Story Here: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/1925342

Friday, May 16, 2014

Medfusion Files Lawsuit against Allscripts



Patient portal vendor Medfusion has filed a legal complaint against health IT vendor Allscripts. The lawsuit, filed May 15 in Wake County, N.C., is seeking millions of dollars in damages for breach of contract and fraud, among other allegations.

"We had negotiated to take our relationship with Allscripts to another level and Allscripts did not meet many of the commitments that we laid out there and it really impacted our ability to deliver for customers," says Steven Malik, CEO of Medfusion. "The basis of the claim is really three things: Allscripts didn't meet its development commitments, which directly impacted our ability to deliver innovation to clients; Allscripts didn't meet its sales and marketing commitments; and there's a payment issue as well given that they withheld payment to us."

Medfusion Files Lawsuit against Allscripts



Patient portal vendor Medfusion has filed a legal complaint against health IT vendor Allscripts. The lawsuit, filed May 15 in Wake County, N.C., is seeking millions of dollars in damages for breach of contract and fraud, among other allegations.

"We had negotiated to take our relationship with Allscripts to another level and Allscripts did not meet many of the commitments that we laid out there and it really impacted our ability to deliver for customers," says Steven Malik, CEO of Medfusion. "The basis of the claim is really three things: Allscripts didn't meet its development commitments, which directly impacted our ability to deliver innovation to clients; Allscripts didn't meet its sales and marketing commitments; and there's a payment issue as well given that they withheld payment to us."

Mother, son sent to prison for health care fraud



ELIZABETH CITY, N.C. (AP) -- Federal authorities say the mother and son who owned and operated a now-defunct medical transport company in Gates County face prison sentences for conspiracy to commit health care and wire fraud. The U.S. Attorney's Office in Raleigh said Thursday that Phyllis Stallings Harrell, former owner of Harrell Medical Transport, was sentenced to six years in prison. Her son, Paul Lynn Trueblood, was sentenced to nearly 4 1/2 years. Paul Trueblood is the company's former operator.

Mother, son sent to prison for health care fraud



ELIZABETH CITY, N.C. (AP) -- Federal authorities say the mother and son who owned and operated a now-defunct medical transport company in Gates County face prison sentences for conspiracy to commit health care and wire fraud. The U.S. Attorney's Office in Raleigh said Thursday that Phyllis Stallings Harrell, former owner of Harrell Medical Transport, was sentenced to six years in prison. Her son, Paul Lynn Trueblood, was sentenced to nearly 4 1/2 years. Paul Trueblood is the company's former operator.

Deputies: Caretaker defrauded elderly victim



DARE COUNTY, N.C. (WAVY) – Deputies say an 89-year-old person was the victim of fraud, and the suspect was her own caretaker.

Chief Deputy Steve Hoggard with the Dare County Sheriff’s Office said the investigation began May 6 when deputies received a complaint of fraud against the victim.

Deputies say Amy Higgins Dough, 48, of Manteo opened credit card accounts in the victim’s name and used the cards at various businesses in the Outer Banks for her own purposes. The victim lost a significant amount of money.

Dough was the victim’s caretaker. She was arrested Tuesday and charged with financial card fraud and unlawfully obtaining a credit card.

Deputies: Caretaker defrauded elderly victim



DARE COUNTY, N.C. (WAVY) – Deputies say an 89-year-old person was the victim of fraud, and the suspect was her own caretaker.

Chief Deputy Steve Hoggard with the Dare County Sheriff’s Office said the investigation began May 6 when deputies received a complaint of fraud against the victim.

Deputies say Amy Higgins Dough, 48, of Manteo opened credit card accounts in the victim’s name and used the cards at various businesses in the Outer Banks for her own purposes. The victim lost a significant amount of money.

Dough was the victim’s caretaker. She was arrested Tuesday and charged with financial card fraud and unlawfully obtaining a credit card.

Thursday, May 15, 2014

Self-proclaimed LulzSec leader to be tried in July



Trial of alleged 'international mastermind' shrunk to TWO WHOLE DAYS in court

After repeated delays by prosecutors, alleged LulzSec “leader” Matthew Flannery has finally had a trial date set, for July this year, in a case expected to last just two days.

Working under the name Aush0k, Flannery was originally pitched to the media as a “significant risk” and a “leader” of LulzSec, a claim many doubted at the time, especially when it emerged that his victim was the Website of a small and remote regional council in New South Wales.

While the Australian Federal Police was pleased as punch with its pinch, in the year since the arrest, the Commonwealth Department of Public Prosecutions has sought repeated adjournments of the trial.

Because of the AFP's claim that Flannery was “in a position of trust” at his employer, Content Security, the company was obliged to go public to state that the accused was on a three-month probation with no access to customer data.

Self-proclaimed LulzSec leader to be tried in July



Trial of alleged 'international mastermind' shrunk to TWO WHOLE DAYS in court

After repeated delays by prosecutors, alleged LulzSec “leader” Matthew Flannery has finally had a trial date set, for July this year, in a case expected to last just two days.

Working under the name Aush0k, Flannery was originally pitched to the media as a “significant risk” and a “leader” of LulzSec, a claim many doubted at the time, especially when it emerged that his victim was the Website of a small and remote regional council in New South Wales.

While the Australian Federal Police was pleased as punch with its pinch, in the year since the arrest, the Commonwealth Department of Public Prosecutions has sought repeated adjournments of the trial.

Because of the AFP's claim that Flannery was “in a position of trust” at his employer, Content Security, the company was obliged to go public to state that the accused was on a three-month probation with no access to customer data.

TechEd: Microsoft says Tor cannot stop PRISM snoops and cyber crooks



HOUSTON: The Tor network can not protect web users from cyber criminals and state hackers, according to a top Microsoft security expert.

Andy Malone, Microsoft most valued professional in enterprise security and founder of the Cyber Crime Security Forum, said that despite the robust nature of the Tor network, its use of third-party add-ons means there are still ways to track, spy and steal data from its users.

"There is no such thing as really being anonymous on the internet. If [hackers and government agencies] want you, they will get you," he said.

"At the moment the Tor network's security has never been broken, but there are flaws around it that can be exploited.

"Tor leaks do occur through third-party apps and add-ons, like Flash. If I was doing forensics on you and thought you were on Tor I wouldn't attack the network I'd attack the weak areas around it."

TechEd: Microsoft says Tor cannot stop PRISM snoops and cyber crooks



HOUSTON: The Tor network can not protect web users from cyber criminals and state hackers, according to a top Microsoft security expert.

Andy Malone, Microsoft most valued professional in enterprise security and founder of the Cyber Crime Security Forum, said that despite the robust nature of the Tor network, its use of third-party add-ons means there are still ways to track, spy and steal data from its users.

"There is no such thing as really being anonymous on the internet. If [hackers and government agencies] want you, they will get you," he said.

"At the moment the Tor network's security has never been broken, but there are flaws around it that can be exploited.

"Tor leaks do occur through third-party apps and add-ons, like Flash. If I was doing forensics on you and thought you were on Tor I wouldn't attack the network I'd attack the weak areas around it."

Putting a fraud alert to the test



After someone tried to hijack my credit card, I filed an initial fraud alert for extra protection. Then I tested it by applying for a new card from a different issuer.

To back up a minute -- a fraud alert is a kind of red flag used by the big three credit bureaus. After you file one, lenders are supposed to make extra sure they're dealing with you, not an impostor. They can still pull your credit report and process a loan application, but the alert on your credit report should give them pause.

You file the alert with one of the majors, and they share it with the other two, when you have reason to believe you are at risk.

I had reason. My all-purpose card had nearly been taken over. Someone, using the card number and my identifying details, had tried to change the mailing address. They were probably about to ask for a new card to be mailed out, but an alert from the card issuer reached me in time to stop the hijacking.

The episode provided a chance to test the anti-fraud system by applying for a new card. Now the results are in: For me, in the very limited sample of just one card application, the alert seemed to work.

Putting a fraud alert to the test



After someone tried to hijack my credit card, I filed an initial fraud alert for extra protection. Then I tested it by applying for a new card from a different issuer.

To back up a minute -- a fraud alert is a kind of red flag used by the big three credit bureaus. After you file one, lenders are supposed to make extra sure they're dealing with you, not an impostor. They can still pull your credit report and process a loan application, but the alert on your credit report should give them pause.

You file the alert with one of the majors, and they share it with the other two, when you have reason to believe you are at risk.

I had reason. My all-purpose card had nearly been taken over. Someone, using the card number and my identifying details, had tried to change the mailing address. They were probably about to ask for a new card to be mailed out, but an alert from the card issuer reached me in time to stop the hijacking.

The episode provided a chance to test the anti-fraud system by applying for a new card. Now the results are in: For me, in the very limited sample of just one card application, the alert seemed to work.

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

This free tool can guard against identity theft



With data breaches occurring with more frequency and hackers devising more clever ways to access your personal information, identity theft now affects more people.

The results are devastating. Armed with your Social Security number and other bits of information about you, an identity thief can open credit card accounts and take out loans in your name.

Your credit will be ruined and you will spend months – maybe years – untangling the mess. Fortunately there is a simple and free way to reduce your chances of becoming a victim.
Work with credit agencies

Contact each of the three credit reporting agencies – Experian, Equifax and Transunion and request a fraud alert – or even an extended fraud alert -- on your credit file. This simply means that no one can access your credit file without verifying your identity first.


This free tool can guard against identity theft



With data breaches occurring with more frequency and hackers devising more clever ways to access your personal information, identity theft now affects more people.

The results are devastating. Armed with your Social Security number and other bits of information about you, an identity thief can open credit card accounts and take out loans in your name.

Your credit will be ruined and you will spend months – maybe years – untangling the mess. Fortunately there is a simple and free way to reduce your chances of becoming a victim.
Work with credit agencies

Contact each of the three credit reporting agencies – Experian, Equifax and Transunion and request a fraud alert – or even an extended fraud alert -- on your credit file. This simply means that no one can access your credit file without verifying your identity first.


Monday, May 12, 2014

Exercise restrain, caution when interacting online



SANDAKAN: Cyber fraud and identity theft could be avoided if consumers exercise restrain and caution while interacting online.
Malaysian Communications and Multimedia Commission (MCMC) chairman Datuk Mohamed Sharil Tarmizi warned consumers not to readily divulge personal information through the internet to unidentified persons.

Speaking at a media conference in conjunction with an MCMC awareness programme here today, he further warned that consumers could be held responsible for any contentious material they uploaded on the internet.

He advised consumers who had fallen victim to dubious online transactions, to report the crime to the police before referring their complaint to the MCMC.

Source and Full Story Here: http://www.nst.com.my/latest/exercise-restrain-caution-when-interacting-online-1.593824

Exercise restrain, caution when interacting online



SANDAKAN: Cyber fraud and identity theft could be avoided if consumers exercise restrain and caution while interacting online.
Malaysian Communications and Multimedia Commission (MCMC) chairman Datuk Mohamed Sharil Tarmizi warned consumers not to readily divulge personal information through the internet to unidentified persons.

Speaking at a media conference in conjunction with an MCMC awareness programme here today, he further warned that consumers could be held responsible for any contentious material they uploaded on the internet.

He advised consumers who had fallen victim to dubious online transactions, to report the crime to the police before referring their complaint to the MCMC.

Source and Full Story Here: http://www.nst.com.my/latest/exercise-restrain-caution-when-interacting-online-1.593824

IMPD issues fraud alert for serial scammer



INDIANAPOLIS - Indianapolis Metropolitan Police issued a warning this week about a fraudulent contractor whose victims are spread citywide.

Quite simply, police say, if Jason Moore shows up at your business – tell him to leave. And then call 911.

"I think he deserves to feel the wrath of the law for what he's done," said Bill Winand, one of Moore's alleged fraud victims. "If he doesn't get stopped, he's just going to continue to do it. He just preys on innocent people."

Last month, Moore allegedly showed up at Tommy's Jerky with an offer to replace the signage on the business. Winand wrote Moore a check as a down payment – never to hear from him again.

Kelly Brown got the same sales pitch, and the same result, at her business, Another One's Treasure.

"It's not so much the money for me as he's been on every side of town doing this," Brown said. "And he needs to be stopped."

Steve's Florist got hit hard, writing Moore two checks totaling nearly $1,300. That was more than two months ago.

"My son and I are very angry with him because he has not kept in touch with us. He doesn't show up," said Steve Huth. "We feel we've been taken."

Metro police believe more than a dozen small businesses may have been taken in by Moore's sales pitch. Investigators say it's a bad sign if Moore winds up in your store.

Source and Full Story Here: http://www.theindychannel.com/news/local-news/impd-issues-fraud-alert-for-serial-scammer

IMPD issues fraud alert for serial scammer



INDIANAPOLIS - Indianapolis Metropolitan Police issued a warning this week about a fraudulent contractor whose victims are spread citywide.

Quite simply, police say, if Jason Moore shows up at your business – tell him to leave. And then call 911.

"I think he deserves to feel the wrath of the law for what he's done," said Bill Winand, one of Moore's alleged fraud victims. "If he doesn't get stopped, he's just going to continue to do it. He just preys on innocent people."

Last month, Moore allegedly showed up at Tommy's Jerky with an offer to replace the signage on the business. Winand wrote Moore a check as a down payment – never to hear from him again.

Kelly Brown got the same sales pitch, and the same result, at her business, Another One's Treasure.

"It's not so much the money for me as he's been on every side of town doing this," Brown said. "And he needs to be stopped."

Steve's Florist got hit hard, writing Moore two checks totaling nearly $1,300. That was more than two months ago.

"My son and I are very angry with him because he has not kept in touch with us. He doesn't show up," said Steve Huth. "We feel we've been taken."

Metro police believe more than a dozen small businesses may have been taken in by Moore's sales pitch. Investigators say it's a bad sign if Moore winds up in your store.

Source and Full Story Here: http://www.theindychannel.com/news/local-news/impd-issues-fraud-alert-for-serial-scammer

Thursday, May 8, 2014

Is Obama Really Forcing Banks to Close Porn Stars' Accounts? No, Says Chase Insider



If this were a Hardy Boys book, it would be The Hardy Boys and the Mystery of the Porn Stars' Disappearing Bank Accounts.

Last month, porn star Teagan Presley told Vice that JPMorgan Chase & Co. closed her account because the bank considered her "high-risk." Then, on Wednesday, porn director David Lord told the Daily Beast that Chase sent him a letter notifying him that the bank was going to close his account on May 11. The Beast and Vice suggested that a secretive Justice Department program, "Operation Choke Point," was behind the account closures. But a Chase insider familiar with the matter says that the initiative has nothing to do with the termination of these accounts.

"This has nothing to do with Operation Choke Point," the source told Mother Jones. "There's not a targeted effort to exit consumers' accounts because of an affiliation with an industry [and] we have no policy that would prohibit a consumer from having a checking account because of an affiliation with this industry. We routinely exit consumers for a variety of reasons. For privacy reasons we can't get into why."

The porn stars' allegations play into a narrative—pushed by banks and congressional Republicans—that the Obama administration is overstretching its authority by forcing banks to police the free market. Here's the real story:

What is Operation Choke Point? Operation Choke Point is a federal initiative that aims to crack down on fraud by honing in on banks and payment processors—the companies that serve as middlemen between merchants and banks on credit card transactions. Financial institutions are not supposed to do business with companies they believe might be breaking the law. But Justice Department officials suspect that some payment processors ignore signs of fraud—like high percentages of transactions being rejected as unauthorized—in transactions they process, and banks go along for the ride, earning massive profits.

The Justice Department has already filed one lawsuit under the program. In January, the government sued Four Oaks Bank in North Carolina, charging that it "knew or was deliberately ignorant" that it was working with a company that processed payments for merchants who were breaking the law. According to the lawsuit, Four Oaks worked with a Texas-based payment processor that processed about $2.4 billion in transactions on behalf of fraudulent payday lenders, internet gambling entities, and a Ponzi fraud scheme. The processor then allegedly paid Four Oaks more than $850,000 in fees. (In April, Four Oaks reached a $1.2 million settlement with the government, but did not admit wrongdoing.)

Is Obama Really Forcing Banks to Close Porn Stars' Accounts? No, Says Chase Insider



If this were a Hardy Boys book, it would be The Hardy Boys and the Mystery of the Porn Stars' Disappearing Bank Accounts.

Last month, porn star Teagan Presley told Vice that JPMorgan Chase & Co. closed her account because the bank considered her "high-risk." Then, on Wednesday, porn director David Lord told the Daily Beast that Chase sent him a letter notifying him that the bank was going to close his account on May 11. The Beast and Vice suggested that a secretive Justice Department program, "Operation Choke Point," was behind the account closures. But a Chase insider familiar with the matter says that the initiative has nothing to do with the termination of these accounts.

"This has nothing to do with Operation Choke Point," the source told Mother Jones. "There's not a targeted effort to exit consumers' accounts because of an affiliation with an industry [and] we have no policy that would prohibit a consumer from having a checking account because of an affiliation with this industry. We routinely exit consumers for a variety of reasons. For privacy reasons we can't get into why."

The porn stars' allegations play into a narrative—pushed by banks and congressional Republicans—that the Obama administration is overstretching its authority by forcing banks to police the free market. Here's the real story:

What is Operation Choke Point? Operation Choke Point is a federal initiative that aims to crack down on fraud by honing in on banks and payment processors—the companies that serve as middlemen between merchants and banks on credit card transactions. Financial institutions are not supposed to do business with companies they believe might be breaking the law. But Justice Department officials suspect that some payment processors ignore signs of fraud—like high percentages of transactions being rejected as unauthorized—in transactions they process, and banks go along for the ride, earning massive profits.

The Justice Department has already filed one lawsuit under the program. In January, the government sued Four Oaks Bank in North Carolina, charging that it "knew or was deliberately ignorant" that it was working with a company that processed payments for merchants who were breaking the law. According to the lawsuit, Four Oaks worked with a Texas-based payment processor that processed about $2.4 billion in transactions on behalf of fraudulent payday lenders, internet gambling entities, and a Ponzi fraud scheme. The processor then allegedly paid Four Oaks more than $850,000 in fees. (In April, Four Oaks reached a $1.2 million settlement with the government, but did not admit wrongdoing.)

Cybercrime going up, says Fraud Intelligence Bureau boss



National Fraud Intelligence Bureau boss, detective superintendent Pete O’Doherty, has said that, from his daily experience, there's a fast hike in cybercrime underway.

Talking to the London Evening Standard, he said that the complexity and volume of such crime is on the rise, both as a specific crime and facilitator of other types of crime.

"Cyber fraud has been described as the modern-day burglary. Now you don’t have to be in a person’s house to rob them — you can be sitting in Russia, for example, and using servers to rob someone in London. It is a global threat," he has told the news provider.

Some seven in ten reported fraud offences have a cyber component, he said. That's against four in ten around half a decade ago.

And according to the news provider, year-on-year reports of purely cyber crimes have leapt to 22,315 annually, from last year's 11,523, police data shows. That includes close to 500 instances in which companies claimed to have faced server hacking.

Cybercrime going up, says Fraud Intelligence Bureau boss



National Fraud Intelligence Bureau boss, detective superintendent Pete O’Doherty, has said that, from his daily experience, there's a fast hike in cybercrime underway.

Talking to the London Evening Standard, he said that the complexity and volume of such crime is on the rise, both as a specific crime and facilitator of other types of crime.

"Cyber fraud has been described as the modern-day burglary. Now you don’t have to be in a person’s house to rob them — you can be sitting in Russia, for example, and using servers to rob someone in London. It is a global threat," he has told the news provider.

Some seven in ten reported fraud offences have a cyber component, he said. That's against four in ten around half a decade ago.

And according to the news provider, year-on-year reports of purely cyber crimes have leapt to 22,315 annually, from last year's 11,523, police data shows. That includes close to 500 instances in which companies claimed to have faced server hacking.

Cisco Releases Security Advisory for WebEx Players



Cisco has released a security advisory to address multiple buffer overflow vulnerabilities in Cisco WebEx Recording Format and Advanced Recording Format Players. Successful exploitation of the vulnerabilities could cause an affected player to crash or allow a remote attacker to execute arbitrary code.

The following updates are available:
Cisco WebEx Business Suite (WBS29) client builds T29.2 or later
Cisco WebEx Business Suite (WBS28) client builds T28.12 or later
Cisco WebEx Business Suite (WBS27) client builds T27TLSP32EP16 (27.32.16) or later
Cisco WebEx 11 versions prior to 1.2.10 with client builds T28.12 or later
Cisco WebEx Meetings Server client builds 2.0.0.1677 or later
Cisco WebEx Meetings Server client builds Orion 2.0 or later

Users and administrators are encouraged to review the Cisco Security Advisory and apply the necessary updates.

Cisco Releases Security Advisory for WebEx Players



Cisco has released a security advisory to address multiple buffer overflow vulnerabilities in Cisco WebEx Recording Format and Advanced Recording Format Players. Successful exploitation of the vulnerabilities could cause an affected player to crash or allow a remote attacker to execute arbitrary code.

The following updates are available:
Cisco WebEx Business Suite (WBS29) client builds T29.2 or later
Cisco WebEx Business Suite (WBS28) client builds T28.12 or later
Cisco WebEx Business Suite (WBS27) client builds T27TLSP32EP16 (27.32.16) or later
Cisco WebEx 11 versions prior to 1.2.10 with client builds T28.12 or later
Cisco WebEx Meetings Server client builds 2.0.0.1677 or later
Cisco WebEx Meetings Server client builds Orion 2.0 or later

Users and administrators are encouraged to review the Cisco Security Advisory and apply the necessary updates.

Hacker-Turned-FBI Informant Sabu Has Sentencing Postponed for Seventh Time



It seems the FBI is not quite finished with one of its most valuable assets, Hector Monsegur (aka Sabu), the former Anonymous and LulzSec member who had his sentencing postponed for a seventh time on Wednesday.

Monsegur was due to appear before Judge Loretta Preska in New York on Thursday, but he has once again had his sentencing postponed, sources told the Daily Beast.

No new date has been set for Monsegur's next court appearance, giving no indication of how long the FBI wants to keep using him. In April, the U.S. attorney had his sentencing adjourned until May 8.

Monsegur is to be punished for crimes associated with the 50 Days of Lulz campaign, in which hackers attacked companies such as Sony and EA as well as law enforcement agencies including the CIA and SOCA. The former Anonymous hacker has already pleaded guilty to 12 criminal charges, including multiple counts of conspiracy to engage in computer hacking, computer hacking in furtherance of fraud, conspiracy to commit access device fraud, conspiracy to commit bank fraud and aggravated identity theft.

Source and Full Story Here: http://www.ibtimes.com/hacker-turned-fbi-informant-sabu-has-sentencing-postponed-seventh-time-1581602

Hacker-Turned-FBI Informant Sabu Has Sentencing Postponed for Seventh Time



It seems the FBI is not quite finished with one of its most valuable assets, Hector Monsegur (aka Sabu), the former Anonymous and LulzSec member who had his sentencing postponed for a seventh time on Wednesday.

Monsegur was due to appear before Judge Loretta Preska in New York on Thursday, but he has once again had his sentencing postponed, sources told the Daily Beast.

No new date has been set for Monsegur's next court appearance, giving no indication of how long the FBI wants to keep using him. In April, the U.S. attorney had his sentencing adjourned until May 8.

Monsegur is to be punished for crimes associated with the 50 Days of Lulz campaign, in which hackers attacked companies such as Sony and EA as well as law enforcement agencies including the CIA and SOCA. The former Anonymous hacker has already pleaded guilty to 12 criminal charges, including multiple counts of conspiracy to engage in computer hacking, computer hacking in furtherance of fraud, conspiracy to commit access device fraud, conspiracy to commit bank fraud and aggravated identity theft.

Source and Full Story Here: http://www.ibtimes.com/hacker-turned-fbi-informant-sabu-has-sentencing-postponed-seventh-time-1581602